Friday, 7 September 2012

The Arena Massacre of Trinidad Part 2.


ORDINANCE AND DECLARATION OF PEDRO RAMOS (AGED 34
YEARS) CONCERNING THAT WHICH HE OWES.

         In this said town, on the above named day, month and
year, I the said alcalde Don Antonio de Robles received a
notice that Pedro Ramos, inhabitant of this town, had an
account with the Camp-Master Don Jose de Leon, Governor
and Captain General of this town and island, for his Majesty
the King, and that it seems that he owes a certain amount.
So I ordered him to appear before me and the Camp-Master
Don Pedro Fernandez de la Vega and Captain Don Vicente
de Leon y Urrestigui and witnesses, and declare under oath
what he owes to the said Governor. And when he was
present, I the said alcalde received his oath which he made
to God our Lord, and with a sign of the Cross, under the
obligation of which he promised to say the truth, and being
asked, he said that it is true that he had some accounts with
the said Governor, while he was living in this town, after he
began to govern, and that he owes him for fruits of the Island
of Margarita, hides, cheese, meat, two hundred and forty-three
pesos and two reales, which he is ready to hand over in the
nature of cacao, as is the custom, to whom he will be ordered
to pay. And that a receipt he given him for his security.
And after having seen this, I the said alcalde ordered him to
hand over this sum of two hundred and forty-three pesos and
two reales to the said Camp-Master Don Pedro Fernandez
de la Vega who was present as Trustee of the said Governor
whom God may have in His residence, and that he keep them
in deposit with the other goods, according to these arrange-
ments. And having heard and understood this, he said that
he had received this quantity on deposit.

         In this said town on the eighteenth of the months of
December of the said year, 1699, we the said Sergeant-Major
Don Juan Martinez de Vengoechea and the Captain
Don Antonio Robles, alcaldes in ordinary, who are in charge
of the government for His Majesty, said that on this same day
a pirogue reached Port-of-Spain of this island from the
Island of Margarita with fruits, under the direction of Sergeant -
Major Don CristobaI de la Riva who brought eighteen letters
addressed to the Camp-Master Don Jose de Leon, Governor
and Captain General of this Island of Trinidad. We found
it convenient to open them and to see, if they contained some
orders for the Royal Service or something that might belong
to the said Governor, and we opened and read them in the
presence of his Trustees who lived here, and of the witnesses,
because there was no Notary Public, and we found that it
was ordinary mail from his friends and his acquaintances of
that island and of its Governor, and we ordered to add them
to the other inventoried goods, and therefore we gave them
over to his Trustees, and we signed in the presence of witnesses.
And in these letters was given a notice that the pest reigned in
Puerto Rico and Veracruz.




DECLARATION BY JUAN FRANCISCO JARA Y VALVERDE, ADJUTANT
OF THE GOVERNMENT OF HIS INDEBTEDNESS
TO THE LATE GOVERNOR.

         He said that it is true that he had some accounts with the
said Governor, and for its settlement he showed different
papers and memoirs, and we the said alcaldes have seen and
inspected those papers too badly arranged for a settlement.
And therefore we gave them back to him in order to arrange
them better, having ample time, because of the many
occupations in which we found ourselves at the death of the
said Governor, the Reverend Fathers of the mission, and other
residents of this town. Signed by the said adjutant in the presence
of witnesses.


DECLARATION BY DIEGO RODRIGUEZ BARRENO OF HIS
INDEBTEDNESS TO THE LATE GOVERNOR.

         He said that it was true that he had an account with the
said Governor concerning some fish for the use of the
Governor's house, arid for this reason he owes to the deceased
one hundred and thirty-three pesos and six reales, and he is
ready to pay this sum to whom me must pay. After having
seen this we the said alcaldes ordered the said Diego Rodriguez
Barreno to pay the one hundred arid thirty-three pesos and
six reales to the Camp-Master Pedro Fernandez de Ia Vega,
local Trustee of the Governor, in whose possession are all his
goods in deposit. This Trustee being present said that this
sum was handed over to him, and he signed in the presence
of witnesses.
And immediately after, on the same day, month and year
above indicated, came before us the Captains Don Vincente
de Leon y Urrestigui and Don Juan Ensebio Pacheco and
showed the order which was given to them to go with forty men
to the mission of Arena and surroundings, to seek and make
prisoners the Indians guilty of the murders of the Capuchin
Missionaries and of the Governor of this place and other
residents, his companions. They were ordered to declare
under oath which they made in due form, what they had
executed in virtue of the order they received, and they said,
that on the fifth day of the present month they left this town
to execute the order at about eleven o'clock and went with
the men, weapons and Indians of Tacarigua and Arauca to
the valley of Arauca to take there a supply of bread. They
did this that day, and then went to the valley of Arima,
where darkness over-took them, and spent the night there.
The following day they left with their men and followed the
road of the mission of Arena which they reached at twelve
o'clock. They found that mission abandoned, the Holy
Church in disorder, and the holy statues with eyes pulled
out, and broken nose. And led by the marks of blood they
sought after the bodies of the dead and they found that
Brother Raimendo de Figuerola was buried within an
enclosure of woodwork, and that the two others and the
carpenter Tomas de Luna were buried in the foundation
trenches of the new Church which they were building, and
which had been filled up. For this reason they left the said
mission on the same day and reached the first cottage to
which the aggressors had gone when they took to their
flight, and passed the night there. And by those very tracks
they could follow them over these mountains and ridges,
until they found themselves on the sixth day of the month
about ten o'clock close to the sea. They despatched the
vanguard to the beach who brought news that the aggressors
were on the beach. And because they were so close to them,
they made three battle-lines with their men and attacked them.
And the said aggressors, seeing that they were attacked closely,
defended themselves and threw themselves its the sea in the
number of ten or twelve, and continued to defend themselves
from there, shooting arrows until they died from bullets.
And in this attack they made two Indian women prisoners of
whom the said Captain asked where the other aggressors were.
And they said that they were in cottages along the beach to
the south, and that they had seen them there, because that
beach was without shelter. For this reason, without delay
and taking as a guide one of those women, and leaving a
guard in this road, they went with the rest of their men, at
that hour, to seek the aggressors who came out from different
places, three by three or more, to the midst of the beach,
where they had brought almost all the members of their
families. And out of the middle of them came forward about
twenty Indians who joined themselves with the others and
pushed their families in a big and rough marsh. And there
the said Captains separated themselves, and while Don Vicente
de Leon followed with half of his men the track in the marsh,
on Juan Ensebio with the other half followed those on the
beach as far as the river that they call Narigua which was
so swollen that the aggressors and the said Captain could not
pass it. Therefore, when those aggressors saw that they were
closely pursued, they threw themselves in the marsh. In this
hunt and search they were occupied the rest of that day, and
the whole of the following day, and they killed many persons,
until those Captains saw the impossibility of taking them
prisoners or following them, because of the roughness of the
marsh. And so they resolved to go back, the more because
the day before the provisions which they brought with them
were exhausted. And so they marched to the first cottage,
and met on the beach Antonio del Campo, Indian General
of the mission of Naparima who with eighty Indians had gone
in search of the aggressors. To those men and that General
the said Captains indicated the place where they were and
recommended him to take great care. And the said Captains
continued their march and on the following day they met on
the same beach Cipriano de Mier and Blas Morillo, with
twenty Indians, who had been sent by us to bring provisions
to them. And having received this help, they resolved to
wait, and had time to gather the sacred vessels, ornaments,
corporals which those criminals had divided among themselves
with little respect, and had thrown away in their flight.
And when Cirpiano de Mier had handed over his provisions,
and a letter written by us to those Captains, they divided
them among the men. And while Captain Don Vicente
explored the borders of the marsh, he encountered four
Indian men and women whom he killed, because he could
not take them prisoners. And Captain Juan Ensebio Pacheco
destroyed with the rest of his men the coconut-plantations to
take away from them the means of living. After this was
done by both Captains, Don Juan Ensebio came to this
town, followed by Captain Don Vincente, without having been
able to do other things. because of the indicated difficulties.
All this which is said and declared is the truth given under
the responsibility of the oath which they made, and they
maintain and ratify it, and for greater abundance refer to the
other declarations concerning this happening which might be
given, and they gave their age, Don Vicente twenty-eight
years, and Don Juan Ensebio a little more or less than
forty years, and they sign with the witnesses present who were
Martin Guerrero, Juan de Mendoza, Rodrigo Marcano,
residents of this town, Juan Martinez Vengoechea y Esponda,
Antonio de Robles, Vicente de Leon y Urrestigui, Don Juan
Ensebio Pacheco, Martin Alonso Guerrero, Juan de Mendoza,
Rodrigo Marcano.


         And immediately after, in view of this declaration, we the
said alcaIdes gave an order that to these acts he added the
ordinance and the papers of help and the notice that this
help was sent to the above named Captains Don Vicente
de Leon y Urrestigui and Don Juan Ensebio Pacheco, as it
was said in their declaration, as proof. And in view of all
this we ordered to take further convenient dispositions. So
we arrange, order and sign in the presence of witnesses.




ORDINANCE.

         We, the Sergeant-Major Juan Martinez de Vengoechea
y Esponda and Captain Antonio do Robles, alcaldes in
ordinary of this town of San Jose do Oruna and of the Island
of Trinidad, in the name of our Lord the King, and in whose
charge is the government of this Island and its provinces, in
virtue of royal orders, because of the death of the late Camp-
Master Don Jose de Leon y Echales, Governor and Captain
General, arranged and gave order to the Captains Don Vicente
de Leon y Urrestigui, and Don Juan Ensebio Pacheco, that
at once and without delay they go with forty armed men to
the missions of Arena, and there and in the surroundings
search and make prisoners the Indians whom they would
find out to be guilty of the death of the said Governor and
other persons who accompanied him in the visit to the said
mission, so as it sufficiently will appear to the said Captains
Don Vicente de Leon and Don Juan Entsebio, and likewise
make prisoner the other Indians whom they find to have been
accomplices of the indicated crime, and bring them to this
town and give them over to the Guard. Likewise they shall
examine the said mission and other places, as they will judge
convenient, in order to know and verify, whether those
Indians killed the Capuchin Fathers, and other damage they
caused there, and the reason of all this, in the shortest possible
time, in order to take all the other convenient measures in
the service of their Majesties, and the public welfare and
preservation of this community. Dated in this town on the
fifth day of the month of December of 1699. And the order
and the charge was given to the said Captain Don Vicente
de Leon, that he as principal commander take the necessary
steps for the fulfilling of this order, and divide the men in
divisions with their respective Chiefs, as it seems best for its
effect and execution, precisely and punctually. And if he
would be unable, or for some other legitimate inconvenience,
then the Second Commander shall execute the indicated
order, as we hope by its loyalty and zeal in the royal service
of His Majesty. Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y Esponda,
Antonio de Robles.

LETTER.

         Sir Captain Don Vicente. As soon as we received your
advice, although oral, through the soldier Florencio, we took
care to send to your Honour without delay to-day Tuesday
two o'clock in the afternoon Blas Morillo and Cipriano
de Mier, with two little jars of brandy and other provisions
and with the order for Captain Juan de Lezama to pass at
Arauca, and add to this the cassava which they would be able
to take with the Indians who would go with them, so that
provisions might not fail them. And in Arauca order was
given to hand over to you the cassava which would be needed,
where your Honour can send some one to hand it to you in
the house of the Fiscal Nicolas. You will give us an account
of all that happens, so that we are advised and make the
necessary arrangements for the chastisement of such an
atrocity, and the preservation of this community, and we
gave a part to your Honour of the news which had been
given us by the Father Prefect Gabriel de Barcelona that he
sent on Sunday before yesterday the General Antonio with
a good number of Indians of his mission and of that of the
land of Moruga, to go through the coconut plantations, and
that they went over the Northern part, without another
reason than that you know what passed there, arid they will
give you this letter, so that at all times this may be evident.
God guard your Honours many years.


Trinidad, the eight of December of 1699. Of your
Honours whose hand they kiss, JUAN MARTINEZ
DE VENGOECHEA, DON ANTONIO DE ROBLES.




ANOTHER WRITTEN MESSAGE.

TO THE CAPTAINS DON VICENTE AND DON JUAN.

         To-day Saturday came to us in our quarter Bartolome
Sanchez and Captain Calixto, with two spies from Arena who
went to Savaneta. They were tortured and admitted that
they alone were the aggressors, without having had a part
with others. Thursday they went to the old plantations on
the road of the coconut plantations, to take provisions and to
take refuge on the mount Tamanaco, to wait there for the
Guarauns and to go with them according to circumstances.
There is nothing else to relate to Your Honours. By the
tracks you will see the way they took. We hope Your Honours
will not come without them. That God our Lord will give
you a good chance for the chastisement of such a crime as
they have committed. God guard Your Honours many
years. To-day the fourth of December of 1699.

         The Servant of Your Honours who kisses your hands.


         By the bearers you will give us news, although they would
be stopped one day.

ANTONIO DE ROBLES.



ORDINANCE.

In this town of San José de Oruna, the fifteenth day of
the month of December, 1699, we the Sergeant-Major Juan
Martinez de Vengoechea y Esponda and Captain Don Antonio
de Robles, its alcaldes in ordinary, under whose care is the
government, declare that the Captain Calixto who is Captain
of the Indians of the mission of Savaneta of this island, received
the order to seek for and to make prisoner and to bring to
this town the Indians of the mission of Arena who killed
treacherously three missionaries who worked in this mission,
and a lay-man, the said Governor and other persons of this
town who accompanied him, brought two prisoners of said
Indians who are under guard. The one is called Pedro, and
the other Luis, and they said that they were aggressors
in this crime, and we order that their declarations be taken,
with the assistance of Captain Don Antonio de Bustamante,
resident of this town, Protector of the Indians of this island,
and we order that this declaration be added to the other
declarations, and in view of all this to take the other convenient
steps. So we arrange, order and sign with the witnesses
present.



NOTIFICATION TO THE PROTECTOR.

         And immediately after we the said alcaldes, made the
above written order personally known to the Captain
Don Antonio de Bustamante, Protector of the Indians of this
island, and he signed it. Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y
Esponda, Don Antonio de Robles, Antonio de Bustamante.


DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN PEDRO.

         In this same town, on the eighteenth day of the indicated
month and year, we the said alcaldes, to fulfil the order above
indicated, received the declaration of the Indian Pedro
through the Captain Luis, chief Indian of the settlement of
Dona Geronima de Urrestigui, resident of this town, who
fulfilled the role of interpreter, because the said Pedro did
not know the Spanish language, and therefore the said
interpreter, being versed in different languages and knowing
the meaning of an oath, made it to our God and with a sign
of the Cross in due legal form, under the obligation of which
he promised faithfully to say that which the said Pedro would
answer to all that would have been asked him, and they put
to him the following questions :- What is his name ? Of
what place is he a native ? What employment and age has
he ? And he answered -That he is called Pedro, that he is
a native of this Island, and of the Mission of San Francisco
de la Arena. They asked him further, if he knows, that it is
a great crime to kill treacherously the Missionary Fathers and
other persons whomsoever; he answered that he did not
know, but that the old people know it. Then, he was asked
who killed Father Estevan and Father Marcos, Capuchin
Missionaries Priests, and the Lay Brother Raimundo of the
said mission, and the carpenter Tomas de Luna, in the mission
of Arena, at what hour and in what manner they killed them,
and for what reason. He answered that there were three
Indian brothers of the same mission who killed the said
Fathers and Tomas de Luna, and that one of those murderers
was the alcalde of that place, and was called Bustamante,
and the two other murderers were called Lucas and Sebastien,
and other Indians of the said mission, and that, after they
had killed them, they stripped them, and with ropes around
the neck dragged them and buried them head first in some
pits which they had made in the construction of a new Church
which the Fathers were building. And it was on a Tuesday,
the first of this month, between nine and ten o'clock in the
morning. And as soon as they had killed the fathers and the
lay-man Luna, all the Indians of the said mission went with
their bows and arrows to the royal road which leads to the
said mission to wait with their weapons in ambush in the
hills for the Governor and the others who accompanied him
in the visit to the said mission. And between three to four
o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, when the Governor
passed, after having crossed the river, they shot a good number
of arrows at him on horseback, until they killed them all,
including the two Negroes who went on foot. And after
having killed them, they left the bodies in the road and went
back to the mission, and destroyed all that was in the kitchen,
broke the statues, pulling out the eyes of San Francisco, and
broke the fingers and the top of the nose of the Virgin of the
Rosary and of the blessed corporals and other ornaments
of the Church, those Indian men and women made "guaiucos"
to cover their bodies. And while the said Indians left behind
the Indian women and the boys to gather provisions, they
went back to the road and stripped the dead bodies, and in
the same manner that of a Dominican Father, and threw
them in the river, except two who had been killed at a further
distance. And when they had done that, they resolved to go
with those spoils to a hill called Tamanaco, situated in this
Island. The said Indian Pedro was put as sentry in a road
to see, if other Spaniards would come ; he became tired of
watching, and went to another mission, where they caught
him and brought him as prisoner to this town. And the
interpreter declared that this is the truth which the said Pedro
had answered to all which was asked him under the charge of
an oath which he made, and he maintains and ratifies this as
Christian and says that he is a little more or less than
seventy years of age, and the said Pedro does not know his age,
but he looks, as if he was a little more or less than twenty years
of age. And because the said interpreter was skilled in
languages and understood the value of an oath, this declaration
was given to him to read, and he said that he had heard and
understood, that it was the same as that which the said Pedro
had declared, and nothing more came to his memory, except
the truth which he had spoken, although he is an Indian of
the district of the said mission and known by the Indians of
that mission. He did not sign, because he said he could not.
The said alcaIdes and the Protector of the said Indians who
were present at all that has been related , signed with the
witnesses who were the Sergeant-Major Don Diego de Alaje
y Tenreiro, Martin Alonso Guerrero and Manuel de Rianos,
residents of this city, Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y Esponda,
Antonio de Robles, Diego de Alaje Tenreiro, Martin Alonso
Guerrero, Manuel Rianos.






DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN LUIS.

         The Indian, Luis, then gave the following evidence through an
interpreter, Martin :  And he answered through the said
interpreter that his name is Luis, although he is not baptized ;
that he is a native of this Island and of the mission of' Arena
and that he does not know his age. He seems to be a little
more or less than twenty years of age. And in the said
mission he had no other occupation than that of planting
fruits.
Asked why he was not a Christian, he said that he was
Iearning to pray. Asked, if he knew who killed in the same
mission of Arena the Reverend Fathers Estevan and Marcos,
Priests, and the Lay-Brother Raimundo, and the carpenter
Tomas de Luna, resident of this town and official carpenter
who was building a new Church in the same mission, for the
increase of the divine cuIt and the instruction in the Holy
doctrine of the said Indians, he answered that he knew those
who killed those Fathers and Tomas de Luna.
         Asked who killed them and for what reason, he said that
Bustamante, alcalde of the said mission, and with him,
Antonio, Sebastian and Lucas, all Indian kinsmen of said
mission killed them, and that the said Antonio was Lieutenant
there, and that the reason, for which they killed the Fathers
was, that they feared that the Governor who would come to
visit said mission, would punish them for their transgressions,
as he had done a few days before in the missions of Naparima,
Savanna Grande, and Savaneta with the Indian sorcerors and
those who contradicted the instruction of the holy doctrine.
And he said that they dragged them and buried them in the
pits of the foundations of the building, putting them in, head
down, and Brother Raimundo close to a pig-yard. And he
added that it was Tuesday the first, between ten and eleven
o'clock in the morning, and that they passed immediately to
the royal road to wait for the Governor and the others who
with him was on his way to visit said mission. And they put
themselves in ambush on the hill at the edge of the river Aripo,
and about three or four o'clock in the evening of said day,
after the Governor and his companions had passed the river,
and were again on horseback, they shot at them a great
number of arrows, until they killed them all and some horses.
And Ieaving the bodies in the road, they went back to the
mission in order to destroy, eat and drink that which was in
the kitchen of the Fathers, making pieces of the sacred
corporals and other ornaments of the Church, with which
they covered their bodies, while they put spies in the road in
case more white people would pass, and returning to the road,
they stripped the bodies of all the vestments, and dragged
them naked in skins to the hill, and the Governor and others
to the river, and retired with the spoils to the mission. There
they resolved to go all to mount Tamanaco to hide themselves,
and not to be punished for such a crime.
         The above was sworn by the interpreter as being correct in the
presence of said Alcaldes, the Protector and witnesses.


DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN WOMAN MATILDA.

         The Indian woman, Mailda, then made the following declaration
through an interpreter, Captain Martin de Mendoza : Asked her
name, she answered that her name is, as it said, that she is a
native of this Island, and married to an Indian of the said
mission, called Juan. She could not tell her age ; she seemed
to be a little more or less than twenty years of age. Different
questions were put to her, and especially who killed the
Reverend Fathers Estevan and Marcos, Priests, and the
Lay-Brother Raimundo, and the carpenter Tomas de Luna,
resident of this town, and she answered through the same
interpreter that Bustamante, Felix, Sebastian, Lucas. Indians
of said mission, and Antonio, Lieutenant there, killed them,
and she heard that the other Indians said this at that time,
and when they took their flight into the coconuts, and that
she likewise heard it said that the Governor and other
Spaniards were killed. She was asked, where they stopped,
when they took to flight and she answered through the same
interpreter that the most of those Indians threw themselves
in a marsh to the south, and that the others threw themselves
into the sea. And her husband and herself and another ten
or twelve men, women and children were killed or taken
prisoner by the Captain Don Vicente de Urresti and DossJuan
Eusebio. She, Matilda and another Indian woman, called
Agustina, were taken prisoner, and the others were killed by
arrows and bullets, and it was impossible to pursue all the
others, because of the roughness of this marsh. And she
added through the interpreter that she knows nothing more
of the happening than what she has declared.
         The above was sworn by the interpreter as being correct in the
presence of the Alcaldes, the Protector and witnesses.

DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN WOMAN AGUSTINA.

         The Indian woman, Agustina, was then questioned. And she
answered through the same interpreter that her name is
Agustina, that she is a Christian, that she is not married, and
that Bustamante, Lucas, Felix, Sebastian and Antonio with
the others killed the Reverend Fathers and dragged and
buried them in the pits that were dug to construct a Church,
and that they buried there also the said Luna, an official
carpenter who was employed in the work of this Church.
And they reduced to pieces the chalices, chrismatory, the
custody, and divided them among themselves, and the other
ornaments and corporals they cut in pieces to cover their
bodies. And they pulled out the eyes of the images, and they
destroyed the consecrated altar, and they did all that about
ten or eleven o'clock in the morning. And at once they went
in ambush to wait for the Governor, and these were
Bustamante, Hilario and others. And when they had fled
to the coconut-plantations, the Captains Don Juan Eusebio
Pacheco and Don Vicente de Leon came with the men they
had taken with them. And they attacked them, and ten or
twelve men threw themselves in the sea, where they died,
killed by arrows and bullets. And she was taken prisoner,
and all the other people were spread along the beach, and as
the rumour went that there had been a fight, they threw
themselves in the marsh. And this is all that she knows.
         The above was sworn by the interpreter as being correct in the
presence of the Alcaldes, the Protector and witnesses.


DECLARATION OF THE CACIQUE DON LORENZO DE MENDOZA.

         On the 19th of December, 1699, at San Jose de Oruna, the
Cacique Don Lorenzo de Mendoza, who belongs to the
Indians of Arauca . . . who, after our order went to
punish some Indians, perpetrators of the murders of
the Capuchin Fathers, made the following declaration
on oath: He said that he was in company of the
Spaniards who left this town on the fifth of the present
month to seek after the Indians aggressors, and that he took
with him all his men, and passed through the mission of Arena,
where he saw the ruins, that the aggressors made, mutilating
the Holy images of Our Lady and of San Francisco, and that
he went with these Spaniards to overtake them, until he
reached the sea, on the beach of which on the ninth day of
the present month about mid-day they found a cottage which
contained between ten or twelve Indians, whom they attacked
with charges of arrows and bullets, until they threw themselves
in the sea, where they were killed by bullets, and of the three
who remained on the beach, those Spaniards hanged two
from the trees. And in the said cottage they made prisoner
two Indian women, from whom they received the news that
the other Indian transgressors were further on the beach, and
with this information they went on in search of them, and
they could put their hands only on some Indian women whom
they killed, and all the others had thrown themselves in a
very rough marsh, into which the said Caeique with the
Spaniards followed them during the rest of that day and the
following day, until they saw the impossibility of pursuing
them further, and sent back to this town, and that the
two Indian women whom they made prisoners are Matilda
and Agustina.
         The Cacique then swore to the truth of the above statement in the
presence of the Alcaldes and witnesses.


                  DECLARATION OF MARTIN DE MENDOZA.

         Martin de Mendoza Captain of the Indians of San
Agustin de Arauca . . . who went to pursue the Indians, . . .
took the oath and declared ... that on the fifth of the present
month he left this town in the company of the Spaniards who went
to pursue the aggressors with their Cacique, and other known
Indians, and when he had reached the said mission of Arena,
he saw the holy Church in disorder, and the image of Our Lady
mutilated by said guilty Indians who cut her nose, and that
of the glorious San Francisco, with one eye pulled out, and
that from there they went to the sea and found there a cottage
which sheltered ten or twelve Indian men of the transgressors.
And there the Spanish Captains made three battle-lines,
two of Indians and one of men with fire-arms and attacked
them, closely pursuing them with bullets and arrows, until
some of them threw themselves in the sea, where they continued
to fight, until they were killed by bullets. And he said that
those Captains hanged two Indians of the three who died on
the said beach, and that in the other cottage they made
prisoners two Indian women, called Matilda and Agustina,
from whom they heard that the other aggressors had dispersed
over the beach towards the south. And with this knowledge
they went on to seek for them, and some came out to fight,
and some were killed in this encounter, and some threw
themselves in a very rough marsh, where they followed them
during the rest of the day and during the following day, and
when they saw the impossibility to take them prisoners,
because of the roughness of said marsh, they resolved to go
back to this town, taking with them the two mentioned
prisoners.
         Mendoza then swore to the truth of the above statement in the
presence of the Alcaldes and witnesses.




DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN LUIS.

         . . . Luis, Indian Captain of the Indians of San Pablo of
Tacarima, because he had taken part in the pursuit of the
Indians of the mission of Arena . . . then took the oath : He said
that on the fifth day of this month he left this town in company
of the Captains Don Juan Eusebio Pacheco and Don Vicente
de Leon y Urrestigui with all the Indians of his party and
that of Arauca and the Spaniards who were sent by us, and
that he reached the mission of Arena which they found
deserted, the temple destroyed, the holy images mutilated,
and from there they marched two days, until they reached
the sea at the coconut plantations, and they, found there on
the beach a cottage of the seditious Indians which sheltered
as many as twelve of them. And when this cottage was
attacked, they defended themselves and threw themselves in
the sea, and from there continued to defend themselves, until
they died by bullets. And in the same cottage two Indian
women were made prisoners, named Agustina and Matilda
who informed them where the others were on the beach, and
there they followed them, until they threw themselves into
marshy land, and they killed some during the rest of that day
and the following day, and seeing that further pursuit would
be fruitless, they returned to this same town with the named
two Indian women as prisoners.

         Luis then swore to the truth of the above statement in the presence
of the Alcaldes and witnesses.

DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN BONIFACIO.

         . . . Bonifacio, Indian of the party of San Pablo of
Tacarigua and their Lieutenant, of whom the oath was
taken because lie was one who went after the aggressors
.  .  .  Said that on the fifth day of this present month
he left this named town in company of the Spaniards
who were sent by us to pursue the aggressors, and
other Indians of their party and other parties, and that on
the following day they reached the mission of Arena, which
he saw destroyed, and the Church in disorder and the holy
images mutilated, and from here he went over with the others
as far as the sea towards the southern part of this Islands
where ten or twelve Indians of the aggressors had taken
refuge in a Cottage, and they opened a fight with them, and
killed them all, because they threw themselves in the sea,
where they defended themselves until they died, and there
they made prisoners two Indian women, called Matilda and
Agustina, from whom they heard that the other aggressors
were in the cottage of that beach more ahead of them. And
they followed them, until they threw themselves in a marshy
place, where walking was very difficult, and that they caused
them there much damage, and killed some, and pursued them
in said Marsh one day and a half, until they saw that it was
impossible to take them prisoner, and returned then to this
said town, having with them the two said women prisoners.

         Bonifacio then swore to the truth of the above statement in the
presence of the Alcaldes and witnesses.

DECLARATION OF THE SECOND LIEUTENANT TOMAS DE LEZAMA.

         . . . Second Lieutenant Tomas de Lezama, resident of this
town .         . . took the oath and said that on the fifth day of the present
month he left this town in company of the said Captains,
executors of this order, and that he with them reached said
Mission of Arena on the following day, and that he saw the
house of the said Fathers with the marks of blood, where the
Indians of the said mission had dragged their bodies, after
having killed them, and that from there he went to the Church,
which he saw in disorder, and a statue of Our Lady with the
nose broken, without crown or other ornaments, with which
they had seen them on other occasions, and the statue of the
glorious San Francisco with one eye pulled out, and many
other images spread over the floor, and the holy consecrated
altar smashed to pieces and pulled to the door of the Church.
And they found the body of Brother Raimundo buried behind
an enclosure of woodwork, and the other bodies in the pits of
a Church which they were building, and that on this day
they went in search of said aggressors, following their footsteps
until Wednesday the ninth of the present month. Then they
found a cottage of the said aggressors, where they attacked
them and killed some of them in the sea, and some on land,
and they heard from two Indian women, that the other
aggressors were further up on the beach, whom the said
Captains attacked without delay. And he in the company of
the Captain Don Juan Eusebio Pacheco went as far as the
river Narigua, pursuing the Indians who came out of their
cottages, fighting and wounding and pursuing them, until
they threw themselves in a marsh. And the Captain
Don Vicente with other soldiers and Indians pursued the
families into the marsh, until night overtook them, after they
had done as much as they could to pursue the said aggressors.
And when the two Captains met, they divided the men in
two divisions, men with fire-arms and archers, and Don Juan
Eusebio remained with those in the middle of the beach, and
Don Vicente with him and the other half of the men went
back to occupy the road to the mount, to see if some of the
Indians would hide themselves there, and during this same
night some of the Simarrones fought to pass through the royal
road where was Don Juan Eusebio. He fought with them,
and cut them off, and put them to flight, until they threw
themselves in the said marsh. And one of the Indians of the
party from Arauca wounded him, and he took prisoner an
Indian woman. And the following morning the said Captain
re-united and resolved to go through this marsh, where they
were occupied during this day, and killed some men whom
they met, because they could not reach them, and they
gathered the ornaments of the Church, which the aggressors
had left behind them to take to flight with all the provisions
they had, and these ornaments, blessed corporals and purifi-
cators, they had divided among themselves to cover their
bodies, and they had broken the chalices, and the crisimatory
of the holy oils, and the patines, and a part of this was given
to everyone, and all that was gathered together and given to
the Indians of our troops to bring it to this town. And he
says that when the provisions failed the two Captains resolved
to go back, the one exploring the borders of the marsh, and
the other destroying the coconut-plantations, in order to
deprive the aggressors completely of provisions. And although
the following day they received help from this town, they
carried on with their plan, because it was impossible to
penetrate the marsh, and he destroyed said coconut-plantations
in company of Captain Dan Juan Eusebio, and from there
they reached this town and brought with them Matilda and
Agustina, Indian women prisoners who belonged to the
criminals.
         Lezama then signed the above statement in the presence of the
Alcaldes and witnesses.


DECLARATION OF SECOND LIEUTENANT GASPAR GUTIERREZ.

         . . . Second Lieutenant Gaspar Gutierrez de Sandoral . . .
took the oath and said that on the fifth day of the present month
he left this town in company of the Captains Don Vicente
de Leon v Urrestigui and Don Juan Eusebio Pacheco,
executors of the order which was read to him, and he declared
that on the said day they reached the valley of Arima, and
the following day they went to the Mission or Arena, and
when he had reached this mission, he saw that the house of
the Fathers was completely in disorder. And he saw the
marks of the blood of those Fathers, where the Indians had
killed them, and had dragged them to the pits of the Church
which they were constructing and there they had buried the
two priests and the carpenter Tomas de Luna. And Brother
Raimundo they found buried behind an enclosure of wood-
work, and he saw that the temple was without ornaments,
and an image of Our Lady with broken nose, and another of
the glorious San Francisco, with one eye failing, and he saw
that the consecrated altar was pulled to the door of the Church,
and smashed in small pieces. And on that day he left that
mission, following the tracks of the aggressors, until on the
ninth day of the present month, about ten or eleven o'clock
in the morning they reached the sea on the southern part of
this Island, on the beach of which they found some cottages,
and they attacked them at that hour, wounding and killing
as many as ten or twelve Indians who defended themselves.
And he went then from here with the Captain Don Juan
Eusebio to the river Narigua, following the aggressors. And
Don Eusebio followed another group who threw themselves
in a marsh, as all the others did, and they threw away all the
provisions and ornaments of the holy Church which they had
divided amongst themselves, and the altar-clothes and blessed
corporals, which they had torn to pieces and with which they
had covered their bodies. And they pursued them until the
following day, when they resolved to go back, because it was
impossible to take those aggressors prisoner, and because the
provisions failed. And so they did, and the two Captains
separated themselves with their men, one to follow the borders
of the marsh on the side of the land, and the other to destroy
tile coconut-plantations, in order to take away from the
fugitives all the provisions. And after this was done, they
went back to this town, and they made two Indian women
prisoner of whom he does not know their names.

         He then signed the above statement in the presence of the Alcaldes
and witnesses.



DECLARATION OF THE SOLDIER FRANCISCO APOLINAR VONEO.

         . . . Francisco Apolinar Voneo, a soldier, took the oath and
declared, that on the fifth day of the present month he left
this town in company of those Captains and that on the
following day he reached the mission of Arena, and that he
saw in the house of the Fathers two pools of blood, and one
in the Church. And in the Church he saw an image of
Our Lady with a broken nose and a piece of her mantle, and
another image of the glorious San Francisco, with one eye
pulled out, and many other images thrown to the ground,
and the holy altar smashed to small pieces at the door of the
church. And he saw that three were buried in the foundation
of a new churcn which they were building. And on the same
day they went from the said mission through steep mounts
and ridges, following the trail of the offenders, until on
Wednesday the ninth of the present month about mid-day
they were close to the sea, and there the life-guard which
marched ahead gave warning that the Indians were in their
cottages on the beach, and the Captains prepared to attack.
The aggressors moved to a better place, and thc Captains
formed three battle-lines of their men, and prepared an
ambush for the Indians and assailed them. A dozen men
defended themselves and threw themselves fighting in the sea,
from where they shot a great number of arrows, until they
died by bullets, and on that beach three died of whom the
Captains hung two of the principals on the trees of this beach.
They took prisoner an Indian woman who told them that
there were different cottages on that beach. And the Captains
left him with other companions to watch over the provisions
and munitions in the first cottage. And the Captains went
with the rest of their men to the other cottages, taking as
guide the said woman prisoner, and for this reason he did
not see what happened there, until at night the Captain
Don Vicente came back to the first cottage, and he heard
that they had done them much damage. And Don Juan
Eusebio remained with half of his men, waiting in the middle
of the beach, where the same night he had a fight with the
aggressors, until he drove them in a marsh that served them
as a place of refuge, because it was thick and very difficult.
And this same night he made prisoner an Indian woman.
And on the following morning Don Vicente left him as guard
of said cottage and scent to join Don Juan Eusebio, and at
night-fall the two Captains came back with all their men,
and he heard how many and difficult precautions they had
taken, and they killed some Indians, and to found many
ornaments of the church which he saw, reduced to pieces,
some to make guaiucos, and the blessed corporals, and purifi-
caters, and chalices, patines, chrismatory of the Holy Oils
reduced to pieces. And on she following day the two Captains
left, after dividing their men, Don Vicente to examine the
borders of the marsh, and Don Juan Eusebio to demolish the
coconut-plantations, and he went with him. And after doing
this, they returned to this town, bringing with them the
two women prisoners.

         Voneo then signed the above statement in the presence of the
Alacaldes and witnesses.



DECLARATION OF THE SOLDIER FRANCISCO DE FIGUEROA.

         . . . Francisco de Figueroa, a soldier . . . took the oath and
declared that on the fifth day of this month he left this town
in company of two Captains and that on the following day
they reached the mission of the Arenales where he saw the
havoc which the aggressors had done, killing the said Fathers
and burying the two Priests and Tomas do Luna in the pits
which they had made for the construction of a new church,
and he saw an image of Our Lady with a broken nose and
other things, and the glorious San Francisco with one eye
pulled out, and other images thrown to the ground, and the
holy altar smashed to small pieces and pulled to the door of
the church, and that behind the church was a horse which
they had fastened to a post and killed by bullets, and a mule
which belonged to the said Fathers with ears, nose and other
parts of the body cut, by which it could be seen that even in
the animals they sought to cool off the hatred they had for
those who gave them spiritual food, And he saw many other
destructions that he does not remember, and on the same day
he went further in the company of the two Captains, following
continually the tracks of these malefactors, until they reached
the sea on the ninth day of the present month, where they
found two of the aggressors whom they attacked in one of
their cottages which contained as many as a dozen Indians,
and when they were forced to defend themselves, they made
for the sea, because our men had cut them off from the thickly
covered mountain to enable them to use fire-arms without
danger to their own men, until pursued closely, and having
lost three men by bullets and arrows on the border of the sea,
the others, in despair, threw themselves into the sea, and
from there they continued to fight, until they were killed by
bullets. And in that cottage they made prisoners two Indian
women, whose avowal Don Juan Eusebio received, and
knowing therefore that the other aggressors were scattered
over the rest of the beach in the direction of the south, he
called his companion who was going to the mouth of another
river. And while they left there the prisoners and the
ammunition under the necessary guard, they went further
on the said hour, until they reached the cottages, from where
the aggressors shot small arrows, and took to flight, until they
saw that they were closely pursued, and threw themselves
in a very rough marsh, after having separated from them the
non-combatants whom the Captain Don Vicente followed
with the necessary men. And Don Juan Eusebio with the
rest of the men went as far as a very swollen river, called
Narigua, closely pursuing the aggressors to the mouth of this
river, and on the bank of this river they turned North, until
they saw that they were closely pursued, and then they
threw themselves in the marsh. And Don Juan remained
there the rest of the day, so that the Indians had no other
place to come out of this marsh. And at night he marched
over the beach, until he met Don Vicente who waited for
him there where the greatest part of the families had entered
the marsh. And Don Vicente left with half of the men to
watch the mount, so that the Indians could not go back to it.
And Don Juan Eusebio remained on the beach, cutting the
passage of those Indians who had the intention of passing the
said river, and about ten o'clock at night a good number of
those Indians came as far as the royal road with whom they
fought, and he was in the company of Don Juan, and they
followed them so closely that they obliged them to throw
themselves in the marsh. And one of the Indians of his
company, called Andres Martin, wounded him, and one of
the aggressors was killed, and an Indian woman, wounded
by an arrow in one arm was made prisoner. And in the
morning Don Vicente returned to the place where Captain
Don Juan was. And they resolved to destroy the marsh with
all their men. And so they did, and they killed some criminals
who were in the marsh, until night robbed them of the
opportunity of continuing their work, and therefore they went
together back to the road of the mount, and they took with
them the sacred ornaments, chalices, patines, custodia and
corporals which the Indians had already divided among
themselves. And there they met Captain Don Vicente with
his men who now went over the border of the marsh on this
side of the land, while Don Juan Eusebio went to destroy the
coconut-plantations, to take away all provisions from the
aggressors. And when each of the Captains had done this,
they both came back to this town, and took with them the
two Indian women prisoners, called Matilda and Agustina.

         He then swore to the truth of the above statement in the presence
of the Alcaldes and witnesses.


ORDINANCE.

         In this same town, on the day, month and year above
indicated I the Captain Don Antonio de Robles, its alcalde in
ordinary for his Majesty, and in whose charge is its government,
in sight of these ordinances and proceedings, say that there
must be charged and that I do hereby charge the said Luis
and Pedro, mentioned in these ordinances, and the two Indian
women Matilda and Agustina of the mission of Arena, prisoners
in this town, with the guilt that results from this information
and from their avowals, because in it they committed a crime,
and I intend to punish them, as will be found according to
law, and I order to give their case over to their protector and
defender Don Antonio de Bustamante, and that he answer
in the first Court, without more delay, to help so the good
and real administration of justice, and that the ordinances be
handed over to him for what he may say or not. So I have
arranged, ordered and signed with the witnesses present who
were the Second Lieutenant Silvestre Ernandez, Juan
Bartolome Randon and Francisco Apolinar Voneo, residents
of this town, Don Antonio de Robles, Silvestre Ernandez,
Juan Bartolome Randon, Francisco Apolinar Voneo.

         And immediately after I said alcalde made known the
ordinance above to the Captain Don Antonio de Bustamante,
Protector of the Indians of this Island, who said that he had
heard it and received it. Don Antonio de Robles. Before me,
Antonio de Bustamante.


DECLARATION OF THE PROTECTOR.

         I the Captain Antonio de Bustamante, General Protector
of the Indians of this province, appear before Your Honour
and say that the ordinances concerning the rebellion of the
Indians of the Naparima- tribe who were in the holy mission
of Arena were given to me. And having seen what was
declared by Luis and Pedro, Indians of the said mission,
prisoners in the royal houses, I have found that neither was
the promoter of the said rebellion, and that they did not help
the others to commit the sacrileges and atrocities, which are
related in the said ordinances, and therefore and because of
their incapacity I implore Your Honour to use mercy in their
chastisement, paying attention to all the laws which favour
them, and at the same time declare free of crime Matilda and
Agustina, Indian women made prisoners during the march of
the Captains Don Vicente de Leon and Don Juan Eusebio
Pacheco, for it seems that such must be done, first because
they did not know the intention of the seditious Indians,
further because they had not communicated it to them and
these women had not been able to advise those Captains, and
if they had tried to do so, they would have been killed, and
last because it is known that the Indians in executing their
resolution never told the women their intention, and held
them in everything ever submitted to their disposition as
slaves. Paying attention to this and to all the circumstances
which are in their favour as women, and not knowing their
intention, I ask and pray Your Honour that it be done, as I
have asked, because it is justice.  Antonio de Bustamante.


DECREE.

         When all these ordinances were seen by me, I the said
alcalde Don Antonio de Robles ordered to hand them over to
the second-Lieutenant José Gonzalez, resident of this town
who is present and whom I appoint as judicial Promoter in
this case in the name of royal justice, and he said that he had
heard and understood and that he accepted, and he made
an oath in due legal form that he will well and faithfully
examine this ease, and he was ordered to cite those Indian
men and Indian women prisoners for the first Court. So I
have arranged, ordered and signed in this named town of
San Jose de Ozuna, Isle of Trinidad, on the twenty-first day
of December of 1699, with the witnesses present who were: -
The Second-Lieutenant Silvestre Ernandez, Juan Bartolome
Randon and Francisco Apolinar Voneo, residents of this town,
and so I act in the absence of a Notary Public. Antonio
de Robles, Silvestre Ernandez, Juan Bartolome Randon,
Francisco Apolinar Voneo, José Gonzalez.


ORDINANCE.

         In this town of San José de Ozuna, on the twenty-third
day of the month of December, 1699, I the Captain Don
Antonio de Robles, alcalde in ordinary and Governor of this
Island and its Provinces, for his Majesty, through the death
of the Governor Don José de Leon y Echales, whom the
Indians of the mission of Arena killed treacherously with
other Principals of this town, as it is written in the acts
concerning this case, ordered and seen by me, because it is
not evident that burial was given to the bodies of the said
Governor, and the Reverend Father Juan Masien of the
Order of Santo Domingo and other bodies at the time that
reached them to see and recognize them the Camp-Master
Don Pedro Fernandez, head of thirty armed men and of the
Indians of Arouca whom he took with him in conformity
with the order that is indicated at the beginning of these acts,
the order was given to the Captain Juan de Lezama, resident
of this town, to take this necessary and pious care and to go
without delay with Juan Cordero and the necessary Indians
of their settlement, and bring these bodies to this town and
give them burial in the holy parochial Church, and in the
case they are in decay to bury them on the spot where they
are found. And he went to execute this order and returned
at once to this town and indicated, how much the river was
swollen where the murder occurred, because it had rained
much the night before, and that these bodies had been washed
away, except that of the Notary Public and that of the
Accountant which were in an advanced state of decomposition
and eaten by animals. And he gave back a bed-sheet which
belonged to the Governor, which was given him to cover his
body until it reached this town. And in order that it may
be evident that he had taken all the care to fulfil his obligation,
I ordered the said Captain Juan de Lezama to declare under
oath all what was done according to this ordinance, and that
his declaration be added to all he others of the same case, so
that it may be evident. Thus I have arranged, ordered and
signed with the witnesses present who were: -Silvestre
Ernandez and Juan Bartolome Randon, inhabitants of this
town, Antonio de Robles, Silvestre Ernandez, Juan
Bartolome Randon.


DECLARATIONS OF CAPTAIN JUAN DE LEZAMA, AND
JUAN CORDERO.


         Captain Juan tie Lezama and Juan Cordero, having taken the oath,
each testified to the accuracy of the above Ordinance.

JUDICIAL PETITION.

         I, José Gonzalez, inhabitant of this town, judicial promoter,
appointed by Your Honour in he case that according to royal
justice has been made against Pedro and Luis, natives of this
Island, and belonging to Arena, prisoners under the guard
of this town, appeal before Your Honour, in the best possible
way that the law permits me, say that on the twenty-third of
this present month Your Honour  was served, because all those
ordinances were handed over to me, in order that I as judicial
promoter make the accusations against the said Indian
prisoners. And after having studied them with due care, I
find therein that the named Indians have been accomplices
with the aggressors of such great treachery that they have
committed, and of such an atrocious crime, and consequently
Your Honour must, according to justice, and to prevent in the
future such crimes, and for an example and the amendment
of the others, punish the said Indians according to law, and
if you do not, there may result in the future greater damage,
and because it is necessary to follow this case according to all
the terms of the law, I ask and implore Your Honour to give
order, to put everything in full light by commanding the
guilty who appear in it to ratify their declaration, and put
them in the state of accusation, in order that I may quote
that which I find in the law. And for all this I ask and
implore Your Honour to pay attention to this and to do
according to what I have asked, as being justice. I ask
justice, and make the oath in due form. Jose Gonzalez.


ORDINANCE.

         Copy of this petition to the protector and defender of the
Indians with the order that he give his answer for the first
audience, and according to what he will say or not, this case
must be proved within the limit of three ordinary days with
all charge of publication, and citation and conclusion for the
judgment. So I have arranged, ordered and signed, I the
Captain Don Antonio de Robles, alcalde in ordinary for
His Majesty, in this town of San José de Oruna, Island of
Trinidad, and under the charge of whom is its government,
on the twenty-third day of the month of December of 1699,
with the witnesses present who were :--The Captain Don Juan
Eusebio Pacheco and Juan Bartolome Randon, inhabitants of
this town, Don Antonio de Robles, Antonio de Bustamante,
Don Juan Eusebio Pacheco, Juan Bartolome Randon.


COPY.

         Immediately after, I, the said alcalde, made known the
ordinance above to the Captain Don Antonio de Bustamante
in his person as protector and defender of the Indians, and
give him the copy of this ordinance, and he signed it with me
and the witnesses present Don Juan Eusebio Pacheco, Juan
Bartolome Randon.


PETITION OF THE PROTECTOR OF THE INDIANS.

         I the Captain Antonio de Bustamante, Protector of the
Indians of these provinces appear before Your Honour in the
name of Pedro, Luis, Matilda and Agustina, guilty of the
criminal accusation which by the office of the royal justice has
been pronounced at the tribunal of Your Honour concerning
the sedition of the Indians of the mission of Arena, say that
Your Honour was served in the execution of the order to give
me a copy of that which was asked by the judicial promoter
appointed by Your Honour, and concerning this and all the
rest of this matter, I repeat that which I have said in my first
petition, and renounce any proof, because there is none to the
contrary of what has been declared and proved in the judicial
proceedings, and having attention to that I ask and implore
Your Honour that he pronounce the sentence according to
justice, considering with attention the incapacity and the
ignorance of the said guilty Indians, and above all that which
his Majesty orders in his royal laws. I ask that you use mercy
as far as justice allows. Antonio de Bustamante.


JUDICIAL PETITION.

         I, José Gonzalez, judicial promoter of the criminal case
that by the office of the royal justice has been brought forward
against Pedro, Luis, Matilda and Agustina, criminals in this
case, Indians of the mission of San Francisco de Ia Arena,
appear before Your Honour and say in the best form that
the law permits me that Your Honour was served in that
they gave to me a copy of a petition presented by the Captain
Don Antonio do Bustamante, Protector of the Indians of this
Province, to which I answer and say that I reproduce that
which I have said in my first petition, and I ask and implore
Your Honour to be served by the order that the said criminals
who appear in it ratify their declaration so that I may propose
what I find in the law. I ask and implore Your Honour to
consider this petition and in sight of this to do what is asked
according to justice. I ask this and made the oath in due
form. Jose Gonzalez.


DECREE.

         That the two Indian men and the two Indian women
ratify their declaration, as you ask. So I decree, the Captain
Don Antonio do Robles, alcalde in ordinary, and in the charge
of whom is the government of this town of San José de Oruna,
Isle of Trinidad, in the name of his Majesty, on the twenty-
-fourth day of the month of December, 1699, with the
witnesses present in the absence of a Notary Public --
The Second Lieutenant Silvestre Ernandez and Lorenzo
Antonio Dominguez, inhabitants of this town, Don Antonio
de Robles, Silvestre Ernandez, Lorenzo Antonio de
Montenegro.


RATIFICATION OF THE INDIAN PEDRO.

         In this said town, on the said day, month and year, we,
the Sergeant-Major Don Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y
Esponda, and the Captain Don Antonio de Robles, under the
charge of whom is its government, because of the death of the
Camp-Master Don José de Leon, Governor and General
Captain, in sight of these ordinances, we order that the two
Indian prisoners Pedro and Luis and the Indian women
Agustina and Matilda ratify their avowals. And we ordered
to appear in our presence and that of the protector and that
of the witnesses, because of the absence of a Notary Public,
said Pedro, through Martin de Mendoza who held the office
of interpreter, because he is skilled in languages and under-
stands the value of an oath, and said Pedro does not speak
another language than his own native tongue. And the oath
was received from said interpreter that he made to God and
a sign of the cross, to make a good and faithful use of the said
office, telling to and asking from the said Pedro that which he
will be ordered by us, and the order was given him to read
the declaration that Pedro had made, in these proceedings on
page twenty-six, in order to tell the said Pedro, as he did, to
say in conformity to this, if it seems to him to add or omit
something of it what passed in the murders of the Reverend
Fathers and the Governor and others who accompanied him
to the mission of Arena. And he said that he had heard and
understood his declaration and he maintains and ratifies it in
this plenary tribunal, and for greater abundance, to have
remembered it after, and after the first confusion, he adds
that at the murders of the Reverend Fathers was present
Cartuja, and that he knows that it is a great crime to kill the
Fathers or any other person, and that he and his companion
Luis were sent by the other Indian aggressors to advise the
Indians of the mission of Santa Ana de la Savaneta, so that
they might be warned and on their head for the damage that
they might receive from the Spaniards for the misdeed that
they had committed. And asked, if the Indians of this mission
of Savaneta had known the atrocity, before it was executed
he said, no. And he knows nothing else than what he has
said, and he says that this is the truth under the obligation of
the oath, which he maintains and ratifies and that he is of
the age which he has given. He did not sign because he
could not. We, the alcaldes, sign with the protector Don
Antonio de Bustamante and the accustomed witnesses who
are :-The Second Lieutenant Silvestre Ernandez, the
Adjutant Juan Francisco Jara and Juan Bartolome Randon,
inhabitants of this town, Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y
Esponda, Antonio de Robles, Antonio de Bustamante,
Silvestre Ernandez, Juan Francisco Jara y Valverde, Juan
Bartolome Randon.


RATIFICATION OF THE INDIAN LUIS.

         The Indian Luis similarly ratified his statement, adding : that
he knows that it is bad to kill the Fathers or any other person,
and that he and his companion were ordered by Cartuja and
the other aggressors to warn the Indians of the mission of
Savaneta, so that the white people would not deceive them
and would not hang the old people and that he does not
know anything else concerning all this. And asked, if the
Indians of Savaneta had had a knowledge of these happenings
before, he said that he does not know. And this is the truth
under the weight of the oath which he made, and maintains
and ratifies.


DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN WOMAN MATILDA.
        
         The Indian woman, Matilda, similarly ratified her statement,
adding : that she heard that the fugitive Indians said that
they waited for Pedro and Luis, criminals of whom mention
is made here, whom they had sent to the mission of Savaneta
to give notice of the sedition, and of the murders which they
had committed, and that she knows nothing else, concerning
that what was asked her, and that she maintains and ratifies
what she has declared.



DECLARATION OF THE INDIAN WOMAN AGUSTINA.

         The Indian woman, Agustina, similarly ratified her statement,
adding : that she knows that Peter and Luis, criminals of
whom mention is made in these ordinances, went to
Savaneta sent by the aggressors, to advise the Indians of the
said mission of what they had done, so that they might do
the same. Questioned by the said interpreter, if those Indians
of Savaneta knew before hand that which the aggressors
intended to execute, she answered that she did not know
and that this is the truth.



ORDINANCE.

         In this said town, on the said day, month and year, we
the said alcaldes Governors, in possession of the ratification
contained in these ordinances, and made by the offenders
Pedro, Luis, Matilda and Agustina, in order to terminate
everything and go over to the citation for the judgment, we
order to give a copy to the protecting and judicial parties, and
band over these ordinances to said judicial party, in order to
make the accusations that he shall find in the law, with the
arrangement that he shall answer in the first audience, and
pass to the other procedures that are to the purpose. So we
arrange, order and sign with the witnesses present who
were :- The Captain Juan de Lezama and the Second
Lieutenant Lorenzo Antonio de Montenegro, Silvestre
Ernandez, inhabitants of this town, Juan Martinez de
Vengocehea y Esponda, Antonio de Robles, Juan de Lezama,
Lorenzo Antonio de Montenegro, Silvestre Ernandez.


NOTIFICATION.

         And immediately after we the said alcaldes Governors
made known the ordinance written above to the Captain
José Gonzalez, judicial promoter who said that he sad heard
and understood it, and signed with us and with the usual
witnesses who were present and were the Captain Juan
de Lezama, Don Juan Eusebio Pacheco, inhabitants of this
town, Juan Martinez de Vengoeehea y Esponda, Antonio
de Robles. José Gonzalez.


JUDICIAL PETITION.

         I, Jose Gonzalez, inhabitant of this town, judicial promoter
in the criminal case, that by the office of the royal justice was
opened against Luis and Pedro, Indians of the mission of'
Arena, and against Matilda and Agustina, appear before
Your Honours and say : That Your Honour was served
according to your order, in that all those ordinances were
handed over to me in full, to formulate the accusations which
I might find in the law, and having seen and studied them,
I find that Your Honour, according to justice, must condemn
them to the accustomed punishment of death the said Luis
and Pedro, because it is lawfully plain in those acts that these
have been aggressors in union with the others, and have
treacherously thought to kill the Fathers, the Governor and
other companions, as it is plainly evident in the process,
without the presence of a proof to the contrary, that excuses
them from the accustomed punishment that they have drawn
upon themselves by the royal laws. And therefore Your
Honour must chastise them with all the severity of the law,
so that every one may understand in the future the crime they
have committed. And if Your Honour does no give an
exemplary chastisement to those two, it may happen , that in
the. future irreparable damage may be caused, as they
experience in the present ; and in order to avoid such damages
and atrocities, Your Honour must act according to justice.
I ask it. Jose Gonzalez.


PETITION OF THE PROTECTOR OF THE INDIANS.

         I, the Captain Antonio de Bustamante, Protector of the
Indians in this province, appear before Your Honour in the
criminal case that by the office of the royal justice has been
followed against the Indians, of whom is made mention in it,
say, that after having seen the ordinances and accusation by
the judicial promoter of Pedro and Luis, prisoners under
guard, I find that, in sight of the declarations that the said
Indians have made, and the guilt that according to these
declarations can be proven against them, the punishment
must be exercised with the greatest mercy, because by these
declarations it is evident that those two are the least implicated
in the committed crime and the least suspected among the
aggressors, for as such the others ordered them as their
servants, only occupied in bringing and receiving messages,
as it is plain by their avowals, and likewise attention must
be paid by Your Honour to their great incapacity, in order
to free them from the accustomed punishment to death, and
likewise attention must be paid to the royal laws which protect
them, and likewise I entreat Your Honour to declare in the
name of justice free of the crime Matilda and Agustina,
Indian women made prisoners on the beach of the coconut-
plantations, because no guilt can be brought against them,
and to pronounce the judgment accordingly, and therefore I
ask and implore Your Honour that he make use of the greatest
compassion. Antonio de Bustamante.


DECREE.

         That all the ordinances be brought forward to administer
justice. This was decreed by us the said alcaldes, Governors
in this town of San José de Oruna, Isle of Trinidad, on the
twenty-fifth day of the month of December, 1699, with the
witnesses present who were the Captain Juan de Lezama, the
Second Lieutenant Silvestre Ernandez and Juan Bartolome
Randon, inhabitants of this town, Juan Martinez de
Vengoechea y Esponda, Antonio de Robles, Juan de Lezama,
Silvestre Ernandez, Juan Bartolome Randon,


ORDINANCE.

         In this said town, on the day, month and year above
indicated, I the said alcalde Don Antonio de Robles, having
seen those ordinances, and that they are ready for the
judgment, order that for it the parties be cited of said
Protector and defender of the Indians and the judicial
promoter José Gonzalez. So I arrange, order and sign, with
the witnesses present, in the absence of a Notary Public, the
Second Lieutenant Silvestre Ernandez and Joan Bartolome
Randon, Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y Esponda, Antonio
de Robles, Silvescre Ernandez, Juan Bartolome Randon.


CITATION.

         And immediately after I the said alcalde communicated
the ordinance above to the said Protector Don Antonio
de Bustamante personally, and cited him for the judgment,
as it is ordered there, and he said that he had heard it, and
signed, being witnesses the Second Lieutenant Silvestre
Ernandez and Juan Bartolome Randon, Antonio de Robles,
Antonio de Bustamante, Silvestre Ernandez, Juan Bartolome
Randon.


CITATION.

         And immediately after, I the said alcalde Don Antonio
de Robles read and made known the ordinance above to
José Gonzalez personally, and cited him for the judgment, as
is ordered therein, and said that he had heard it and signed it,
being witnesses the said Antonio de Robles, Jose Gonzalez,
Silvestre Ernandez, Juan Bartolome Randon.


JUDGMENT.

         Having seen this case directed through the office of the
royal justice against Pedro and Luis, Matilda and Agustina,
prisoners in the public jail of this town, concerning the causes
contained therein to which we refer, and because of the service
due to both Majesties, and the general welfare and preservation
of this community:

         We judge that we must condemn and hereby condemn the
said Pedro and Luis to death; for this reason they will be
removed from the public jail, with ropes around their necks,
and with the voice of the public crier who manifests their
crime along the accustomed streets, and conducted to the
Plaza Mayor, where shall be erected the gallows where they
shall be hung, until they necessarily die, and it is ordered
that no one of whatsoever state, quality or condition he may
be, shall take them from the gallows without our permission,
under penalty of the law. And the said Matilda and Agustina
we condemn to six years of personal service for the Captains
who made them prisoners. And this our definitely fixed
judgment we pronounce, order and sign, and we condemn                 
the said criminals to the cost the amount of which we reserve
for us. Martin de Vengoechea y Esponda, Don Antonio
de Robles,                 

PUBLICATION.

         This sentence was given and published by us the Sergeant-
Major Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y Esponda and the
Captain Don Antonio de Robles, alcaldes-Governors, because
of the death of the Governor, in this town of San Jose de Oruna,
Isle of Trinidad, on the twenty-seventh day of the month of
December, 1699, and we sign it with the witnesses who were
the Captains Juan de Lezama, Juan Eusebio Pacheco and the
Second Lieutenant Lorenzo Antonio de Montenegro, present
and inhabitants of this town, Juan Martinez de Vengoechea
y Esponda, Antonio de Robles, Juan de Lezama, Juan
Eusebio Pacheco, Lorenzo Antonio de Montenegro.


NOTIFICATIONS.

         And immediately after we the said alcaldes-Governors
Sergeant-Major Don Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y
Esponda and the Captain Don Antonio de Robles notify the
judgment to Pedro and Luis, and Matilda and Agustina,
through the interpreter Martin de Mendoza, and to the
Captain Don Antonio de Bustamante, protector and defender
of the said Indians, present, and they said that they approved,
and he signed in the presence of Captain Juan de Lezama and
the Second Lieutenant Lorenzo Antonio de Montenegro,
inhabitants of this town, Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y
Esponda, Antonio de Robles, Antonio de Bustamante, Juan
de Lezama, Lorenzo Antonio de Montenegro.


         And immediately after, we the said alcaldes notify and
made known the above mentioned judgment to the Second-
Lieutenant Jose Gonzalez, judicial promoter of the royal
justice, personally, and after having heard and understood it,
he said that he approved it and signed it with the witnesses
above indicated. Juan Martinez de Vengoechea y Esponda,
Antonio de Robles, Jose Gonzalez, Juan de Lezama, Lorenzo
Antonio de Montenegro.


         This copy agrees with the original, from when it has been
taken, and remains in our possession, written on seventy-two
leaflets of ordinary paper, because this Government has no
sealed paper, and in testimony of this we the said Alcaldes-
Governors for our King, because of the death of the Camp-
Master Don Jose de Leon y Echales, Governor and Captain
General of these Provinces, sign with the witnesses who were
the Captain Juan de Lezama and the Second Lieutenant
Silvestre Ernandez and Lorenzo Antonio de Montenegro, in
this town of San José de Ozuna, Island of Trinidad on the
thirtieth day of the month of December of 1699.


JUAN MARTINEZ DE VENGOECHEA Y ESPONDA.

DON ANTONIO DE ROBLES.

JUAN DE LEZAMA.

LORENZO ANTONIO DE MONTENEGRO.

SILVESTRE ERNANDEZ.

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